A great deal of Britain’s heritage is to be found in its Inns which, over the centuries, have formed a central part of life in both town and country. Inns welcomed the weary traveller, were very often a staging post for coaches, and provided sustenance and rest for humans and animals alike.  Many taverns chose a special and easily recognisable name – that of a white horse. A white horse stands out as something special and has always been revered, as it is today.

Araminta Adlington and Sally Potter have compiled an historical vignette of The White Horse Inns of Britain and the Republic of Ireland in this remarkable gazetteer. They have researched the history of over 1600 buildings, their owners and those who visited them.  Local characters are to be found drinking in ‘their local’ and while writing about them the authors regale us with many fascinating incidents that are now enshrined in folklore.

The narrative is accompanied by over six hundred illustrations of the buildings, beautifully drawn by Vi Sprawling, forming a valuable record of a part of life that is slowly disappearing from the social scene.

A useful index lists many famous people who patronised a White Horse of their choice.

The authors’ meticulous research uncovers a wealth of social history that for the most part has remained hidden. As a useful reference, this book will appeal to historians and public alike.


Genre: British history, Folklore, Gazette, History, Librario, Reference, Social history, Travel
Subjects: Buildings, Folklore, inns, names, pubs
Illustrated by Vi Sprawling